Saturday, November 11, 2023

CONGRATULATIONS TO MARY MACKEY

 Mary Mackey's screenplay The Stand In  has been nominated for Best Feature Film Screenplay at the City of Angels Women’s Film Festival in Los Angeles. 

 

The script of The Stand In is an adaptation of her comic novel The Stand In (published by Kensington Books under my pen name “Kate Clemens). Co-written with her script-writing partner Renee De Palma, the film, which is fast-paced and hilarious, pokes fun at the Hollywood pecking order as it follows the comic misadventures of two women who decide to exchange lives: a Hollywood super star named Jayne and an overworked college composition teacher named Mary Lynn who is so badly paid that she has to moonlight as a checkout clerk. What could go wrong with this swap? Try “just about everything.”



Friday, November 3, 2023

EILEEN R. TABIOS' THE INVENTOR ON BESTSELLING LIST

Eileen R. Tabios' THE INVENTOR: A Poet's Transcolonial Autobiography made it into SPD's Bestseller List for October, also notable since October is the month before the book's official release date in November. We do not mind that it's for the "Poetry Bestselling List" when the book is technically Non-Fiction--so thank you, SPD. Most importantly, thanks to the Readers.





Tuesday, October 31, 2023

CHAPTER ONE WITH LAUREL BLOSSOM


You're invited to read Laurel Blossom's participation to the "Chapter One" series which you can see HERE, but here's an excerpt:

My advice? as Aunt Phoebe would say: follow your instincts. Follow the language that sparkles. One thing leads to another. Let the poem take its own sweet time. Let it tell you where it wants to go. Don’t be afraid to let go of the parts you love that don’t serve the needs of the poem. Don’t be afraid to leave in the parts that scare you. Have fun. Enjoy the process. The results will take care of themselves. You will reach success.




Tuesday, October 10, 2023

NEW PAGES reviews BECAUSE I LOVE YOU,... by EILEEN R. TABIOS


NewPages
has published a review of BECAUSE I LOVE YOU, I BECOME WAR. Eileen's book has many layers--she loves to cram as many layers as she can in a single book--and this review is the first to look at the project in terms of archive-related issues. You can see entire review HERE but here's an excerpt:

"What is so magical about this collection is that we are not left hanging and lost in the dense material of this ambitious project; we are shown abundance and astounding imagination in what remains. This project is love."

 


Monday, October 2, 2023

NEWS ALERT RE MARSH HAWK 2024 POETRY PRIZES!

 

CHAPTER ONE WITH ANNALISE NASSANI

You are invited to read Annalise Nassani's contribution to "Chapter One" with her essay on erasure poetry HERE. Here's an excerpt:

It was just after lunch when the poetry graduate student teacher dumped a pile of discount books onto the table. There were only ten of us, all high school students, sitting in an air-conditioned classroom of some Columbia University building. She handed each student a random book plus some Sharpies. I remember mine had yellowed pages and chewed-up corners. The lesson that day was on erasure poetry. She demonstrated this by ripping a page out of a book and blacking paragraphs of text until only a handful of words were visible. At once, it felt thrilling and blasphemous to be permitted to destroy literature, even if it was books no one wanted. That August afternoon provided plenty of light through several open windows as we began. Sounds of ripping paper and the strong scent of markers filled the room. I don’t remember the title of the book I had nor the poem I created. Yet. I never forgot the joy of taking words from a page to create something new.


Thursday, September 21, 2023

SPD RECOMMENDS DAVID LEHMAN'S BEST!

 

Congratulations to David Lehman whose new "Chapter One" book, THE BIRTH OF THE BEST, is on SPD's Recommended List!



Wednesday, September 20, 2023

PRAISE FOR BRIAN COCHRAN'S TRANSLATION ZONE!

Congratulations to our Marsh Hawk Poetry Prize recipient Brian Cochran whose book Translation Zone was noted in Poets & Writers' feature "Ten Questions for Cintia Santana." You can see it HERE but here's an excerpt:

 

4. What are you reading right now? 

I’m currently rereading a couple of things. Hugh Raffles’s poetic and encyclopedic The Book of Unconformities: Speculations on Lost Time, a book that came to my attention early in the pandemic, thanks to a beautifully written New York Times review by Parul Sehgal. I’m also rereading Translation Zone, winner of the 2022 Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize. It’s a first book by a friend, Brian Cochran. His poems are these acts of emotional and linguistic magic. I’ve been his fan for a long time, and over the last few years his work has reached a level such that I’m always asking myself after reading a poem, “How did he get there?” I also just returned from CDMX, where I did some catching up on contemporary Mexican poetry—recent works by Sara Uribe, Tedi López Mills, Eva Castañeda, and Elisa Díaz Castelo.




Tuesday, September 19, 2023

MARY MACKEY NOMINATED FOR THE NBCA


Congratulations to Mary Mackey whose book--Creativity: Where Poems Begin--has been nominated for the 42nd Annual Northern California Book Award in Creative Nonfiction as one of the best works by a Northern California author published in 2022!



Thursday, September 14, 2023

MARY MACKEY ON CREATIVITY!

You are invited to read Mary Mackey's essay "Creating Creativity" on Sheila Bender's blog, Writing It Real. You can see the whole thing HERE but here's an excerpt:

"I nearly died from a high fever just before my third birthday. I remember the experience well because it was the first time I saw how thin and bright the world could be. I remember lying on a green couch in an over-heated room. It must have been winter, because frost coated the windowpanes, and snow lay on the bare branches of the trees in big lumps. My mother had given me a bottle of Coca-Cola on the principle that I needed to take in more fluids. My temperature must have been somewhere between 105  and 106 Fahrenheit because I was already experiencing that wonderful, detached floating feeling I always get above 105....

I couldn’t have had much of a vocabulary at that age. Nevertheless, words streamed into my mind and came out of my mouth, combining and re-combining into entirely new things. I believe this was the moment when I was given the gift of poetry."





Monday, June 5, 2023

2023 MARSH HAWK POETRY PRIZE WINNERS!

 CONGRATULATIONS!

2023 Marsh Hawk Press Prize Winners

The MARSH HAWK PRESS POETRY PRIZE
($1,000.00 Cash Prize and Publication of the Book)

Chosen by Mary Jo Bang

Liane Strauss: “The Flaws of the Story”

Mary Jo Bang writes: Like Penelope’s daily weaving, ripped out each night in order to keep in play the possibility of a happy ending (Odysseus’s return, Laertes death forestalled), each of these fascinating poems is part of a larger story, each an exquisitely observed vignette that pinpoints a moment of conversation, or observation, or travel, that reveals, much like a chapter in a novel might, a set of characters with moods and conundrums. As the scenes accrue, the individual points in time become an inner life made visible, a brilliant enactment of a mind talking back to the world: “I know as soon as I wake up it’s time to start rethinking everything again.” Unputadownable, as in “so gripping as to be read right through at one sitting.”

 

The ROBERT CREELEY MEMORIAL AWARD
($250.00 Cash Prize)

Chosen by Mary Jo Bang

James Zukin: “Mr. Hand & Ms. Viz”

 

The ROCHELLE RATNER MEMORIAL AWARD
($250.00 Cash Prize)

Chosen by the Marsh Hawk Press Editorial Board

George Looney: “Music Inherent in the Extremities”

 

FINALISTS

Allison Blevins, Elizabeth Coleman, Christian Gullette, Sarah Carey, Brandi George, Michael Weinstein, Patty Seyburn,

N. Minnick, Derek Mattern, Lea Graham, Kathleen Winter, Elizabeth Rees, Connor Fisher, Ellen Malphrus, Cory McClellan



Thursday, June 1, 2023

AL FILREIS ON "CHAPTER ONE"!

You're invited to read Al Filreis' contribution to Marsh Hawk's "Chapter One" project, "Notes toward a pedagogy of ModPo." You can see it HERE, but here's an excerpt:

Whenever I write these days about poetry I express an intense interest in the poem, poem by poem and poetic project by poetic project. Yet what comes through is an even keener concern about collaborative interpretation generally, about our uses and misuses of—and recently our panics over—the technologies that make such collaboration possible at a large scale. Pondering the origins of the interests that have made ModPo—a free, non-credit, open online course—possible, I realize that I am seeking to connect such a social or civic mode of reception with the supposedly difficult, putatively opaque poets and poems I admire and as an educator feel a strong instinct to share (and which I have presented in college classes and open public forums for forty years by now).



Thursday, May 4, 2023

Tuesday, April 25, 2023

MARY MACKEY IN "CHAPTER ONE" SERIES

 You are invited to read Mary Mackey's contribution to our "Chapter One" series! You can visit HERE!




Monday, March 27, 2023

EILEEN R. TABIOS IN "CHAPTER ONE" SERIES

You are invited to read Eileen Tabios' essay on titling poems, the latest installment in our "Chapter One" series! Available HERE. Here's an excerpt:

"... much of my job as a poet takes place before I begin any poem. My job is to educate myself on as many topics as possible, engage in a wide variety of experiences, hone my skills at observation, and meditate over the significance of a variety of events—not for writing a poem but by being better in the world through a basking in experience. All this knowledge and experience are filed in my brain as raw material for when I finally write the poem, e.g., the information on Negros Occidental which had marinated in my mind for three decades. In the actual creation of the poem, I trust in having filed enough mental material for the poem to access as it chooses.

Obviously, the more content there is in that mental file, the better the poem is served. I recently noted in an interview that as a poet I believe in education for education’s sake for avoiding cliches and sourcing new metaphors. As an example, for no particular reason besides education, I learned about black holes, specifically that if one is able to witness the phenomenon, one would see objects falling into those holes in falls that seem never to end. The idea of a permanent falling resonated with me and came to be included in several poems."


Wednesday, March 1, 2023

STEPHEN PAUL MILLER in "CHAPTER ONE" SERIES

You are invited to read Stephen Paul Miller's astounding and moving remembrance of poetry days revolving around a single-sheet poetry journal that he used to mail out to readers and which ended up attracting some of the leading artists and poets of the later latter half of the 20th century. You can see the article at

Thursday, February 9, 2023

POETRY FLASH REVIEWS MARY MACKEY

Congratulations to Mary Mackey whose new book, CREATIVITY: WHERE POEMS BEGIN, received a spectacular review in Poetry Flash! You can see entire review HERE, but here's an excerpt:

POET AND NOVELIST MARY MACKEY'S Creativity: Where Poems Begin is both effervescent and analytical. Her new book serves as part memoir, part guide to the "inner poet" in her readers, part wisdom literature; but ultimately, Creativity resists easy classification or precisely limited function, and that resistance is a virtue. Mackey writes: 

Poetry chose me; I did not choose it. Call it an involuntary act of creation, a constantly surprising connection between self and non-self, a movement from seen to unseen and back again. Call it at its best moments the movement of an adult mind back to the radical innocence and vision of the very young child who sees, not only the reality we all share, but all those unnamed, unclassified parts of reality we learn to overlook as we grow older.

Mackey celebrates the work of involuntary creation, of paying close attention to the details of existence while irradiated by promptings from uncanny sources we recognize only by intuition.



Wednesday, February 8, 2023

CHAPTER ONE SERIES' ARCHIVE

By popular demand the essays that inaugurated Marsh Hawk Press' "Chapter One" Series is back online at

https://marshhawkpress.org/chapter-one-oct-2018-december-2021/

You are invited to peruse!



Wednesday, February 1, 2023

DENISE DUHAMEL ON COLETTE INEZ

In the latest contribution to Marsh Hawk's "Chapter One" series, Denise Duhamel shares her experience with Colette Inez and the lesson she learned about "paying yourself first" as she learned to become a poet. You can read her contribution HERE.